Staying Healthy in the Hospital

Text Sign Showing Your Health Matters. Conceptual Photo Physical

The question begs to be asked; how do doctors and nurses remain healthy and well when a large portion of their waking hours is spent in a hospital setting with not so healthy people? HOW?? What exactly is the secret for not catching every cold and strain of flu? In honor of National Staying Healthy Month, I’d like to share tips and tricks from the experts. Follow along!

Keep Your Hands to Yourself:

Yes, shaking hands is customary when greeting someone. Shaking hands, though, is also a great way to catch a virus should the person who’s hand your shaking have one. Simple. So basically, you’ll want to skip the niceties; no hand-shakes, no hugs, and no close contact whatsoever. Should you actually touch someone who is sick, wash your hands pronto and be extra vigilant about your health.

And on the topic of ‘touching,’ be sure to clean anything that someone with a virus has come in contact with. And I mean anything! Doorknobs, cell phones, counter tops, light switches, keyboards etc. The cold-causing virus can live on surfaces for up to 48 hours, so keep those disinfecting wipes handy.

Gut Reaction:

Here’s a fun fact: Your gastrointestinal tract is home to about 70% of your immune system. That being said, you’ll want to take care of your gut by taking a probiotic regularly and maintaining a diet low in sugar and fat, and high in vegetables and fruit. Top that off with a multivitamin that contains ‘cold-fighting’ Vitamin C, and you’re good to go.

The ‘Happy Birthday’ Rule:

In order to completely and totally disinfect your hands, you must spend approximately 20 seconds scrubbing with soap and water. Does counting seem rather boring? Sing ‘Happy Birthday’ twice to be sure that you’ve scrubbed long enough.

And take note. Just because you’re vigorously scrubbing between patients, you must still be mindful of where your hands go. Try to avoid touching public surfaces like railings and elevator buttons, and be extra careful not to touch your face, because if there are any germs whatsoever left on your hands, there’s a very good chance they’ll enter through your nose, mouth or eyes.

Step Outside:

Literally, though. Layer up in your favorite scrub tee and scrub jacket and go outdoors and get some fresh air. The reason people tend to get sick during the winter months, is because we’re all breathing the same recirculated air. And recirculated air is the perfect home for nasty bacteria and viruses. So embrace the outdoors, keep a window or two open, and if that’s not possible, get an air purifier.

Stay healthy and warm!! Happy Winter!

Dressed for Success
Oh, how beautiful!